Wednesday, November 22, 2017

The Clock Is Ticking – Deadlines Are Coming!

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Accepted | Helping applicants like you apply confidently and successfully for over 20 years. <<Get Accepted!>>

The post The Clock Is Ticking – Deadlines Are Coming! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.


from Accepted Admissions Blog
https://blog.accepted.com/the-clock-is-ticking-deadlines-are-coming/

Mortgage Rates Wednesday: Quiet on the Eve of Thanksgiving

Premeds: What If You Could Do Something Now to Boost Your Chances of Acceptance?

Download the free guide - Med School Action Plan: 6 steps to acceptance

Say you’re a premed who’s planning to apply to med school this year. It’s definitely time to get serious about your plans – and start bringing those med school dreams from the “dream” level to the “action plan” level. What can you do now to work towards a successful application process?

One step: Read our free guide, Medical School Admissions Action Plan: Six Steps to Acceptance. In this guide, you’ll learn key strategic steps you can take right now – before you start applying – that will help you get accepted.

You’ll learn to assess your application profile, identify and ameliorate weaknesses, and understand the med school application process start to finish (including secondaries and interviews).

Med school admissions are extremely competitive, and also involve a major investment of time and money. Medical School Admissions Action Plan: Six Steps to Acceptance will help you prepare to approach the application process strategically, and put yourself in the best possible position.

Get Your Guide!

Download your copy today – and start preparing your own action plan!

Accepted | Helping applicants like you apply confidently and successfully for over 20 years. <<Get Accepted!>>

The post Premeds: What If You Could Do Something Now to Boost Your Chances of Acceptance? appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.


from Accepted Admissions Blog
https://blog.accepted.com/premeds-what-if-you-could-do-something-now-to-boost-your-chances-of-acceptance/

Using Head, Heart and Gut for GMAT and GRE Success [Part 1]

Using Head, Heart, and Gut for GMAT and GRE Success

Here’s what I believe: Tests not only measure what you know, they also measure how well you take tests.

It’s extremely rare that someone waltzes into a GRE or GMAT center without preparation and aces their test. Even a lot of test preparation won’t always help if you don’t employ a multi-intelligence approach to your study and test-taking strategies. Tests judge you beyond academic know-how, and reward or penalize you based on how adept you are in using other forms of intelligence such as your heart and gut intelligence. When all three types of intelligence are honed and used appropriately, they can upgrade your performance and increase your score.

In this post I introduce how to think about these intelligence modes as well as some techniques to master them so you can approach the test in a focused and confident manner. Here are the three forms of intelligence:

“Head Intelligence” involves mastering material and recalling it correctly.

“Heart Intelligence” is dedicating time, focus and endurance to complete the test.

“Gut intelligence” involves answering questions in a conscious manner. You need to be fully engaged with each question, and not distracted by other things happening around you or in your mind.

While these tests are highly coachable, most people focus on “head” intelligence and neglect “heart” and “gut” intelligence. Utilizing all the three types of intelligence, however, promotes an increased intimacy with the material and process and helps your performance. These different types of intelligence are also transferable to a myriad of other situations, including relationships, your job, and in the pursuit of your goals.

So how do you learn to use and trust your head, heart, and gut, to answer questions correctly as often as possible? Practice.

First, “head” intelligence. Have you gone through the content and are you assured you’ve mastered it? If yes, move on. If not, what will it take to learn all that you need to know to get the score you need? How many medium and difficult questions must you answer correctly (assuming you get all the easy ones right should they show up) to earn the score you seek?

Get some “heart” in the mix: set a goal and develop an action plan to actualize it. Included in the plan should be when and for how long you’ll study (keep in mind you might want to take the exam at least twice). Be aware of how long the test sections take and what this feels like. The test is a marathon, not a sprint, and the study for it should be as well. Remember: it’s not just what you know; it’s how you show up for the test. (This last point will be discussed more in part II).

Finally, doing a lot of practice will allow your “gut” intelligence to kick in. You’ll start to feel the difference between a right, wrong, and a weak answer. It’s a kind of knowing that is somewhat indescribable, but you’ve likely felt it at some time – like when you “get a feeling” about something, someone or a situation. While I don’t recommend you solely rely on your gut as a test-taking default strategy, don’t be surprised when you become so aware, that you begin answering without even reading RC essays or looking at the questions in the math/quant! I’ve demonstrated this to students and now boast a near-perfect score on many Facebook tests even when I don’t know the subject matter. I have cultivated head, heart and gut intelligence and you can do it too!

For best performance on the GMAT, GRE or any other high stakes test, learning to understand, identify, and integrate the three types of intelligence combined with continuous practice promotes engagement with the questions. Use of the multiple forms of intelligence makes the process more dynamic and focused and leads to more consistent performance at a higher level.

Regi

Bara Sapir, CEO and Founder of Test Prep New York and Test Prep San Francisco, is a nationally recognized test anxiety relief expert and sought-after speaker with over 20 years of experience. Each year she helps hundreds of students through workshops, webinars, articles, products, and books, and works privately with a number of students.

Related Resources:

MBA Action Plan: 6 Steps for the 6 Months Before You Apply, a free guide
GMAT & MBA Admissions: True or False?
3 Tips to Reduce GMAT Test Anxiety

The post Using Head, Heart and Gut for GMAT and GRE Success [Part 1] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.


from Accepted Admissions Blog
https://blog.accepted.com/using-head-heart-and-gut-for-gmat-and-gre-success-part-1/

Betterment Adds a Charitable Giving Option

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

How a Balance Transfer Affects Your Credit Score

Moving high-interest credit card debt to a card with a lower rate — or, better yet, a 0% interest period — can save you hundreds of dollars while making it easier to pay down what you owe. As the cornerstone of a debt-reduction plan, a balance transfer can be a very smart move, but it won’t affect your...


from NerdWallet
https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/credit-cards/balance-transfer-affects-credit-score/